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GMs

TOM P. GORMAN (1940-1946)

Tom P.
Gorman

1940 -
Date of birth June 9th, 1886
Place of birth Ottawa, ON, CAN
Deceased on May 15th, 1961
Seasons - MTL 6
Seasons - NHL 13
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the team has played
W Wins - Games the team has won, either in regulation or in overtime
L Losses - Games the team has lost in regulation
T Ties - Games that have ended in a tie
OTL Overtime losses - Games lost in overtime
PTS Points - Team points, calculated from W, L, T, OTL and SOL; used to determine standings
TOTALS 296 157 102 37 0 351
1940-1941 48 16 26 6 0 38
1941-1942 48 18 27 3 0 39
1942-1943 50 19 19 12 0 50
1943-1944 50 38 5 7 0 83
1944-1945 50 38 8 4 0 80
1945-1946 50 28 17 5 0 61
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the team has played
W Wins - Games the team has won, either in regulation or in overtime
L Losses - Games the team has lost in regulation
RESULT Result
TOTALS 35 21 14  
1940-1941 3 1 2 Quarterfinals
1941-1942 3 1 2 Quarterfinals
1942-1943 5 1 4 Semifinals
1943-1944 9 8 1 Stanley Cup Champions
1944-1945 6 2 4 Semifinals
1945-1946 9 8 1 Stanley Cup Champions
In hockey circles, Tom Gorman’s name is synonymous with success. Blessed with tremendous instincts, Gorman was above all else, a visionary. While he never played the game himself, he nevertheless etched his name on the Stanley Cup seven times as either a head coach or general manager.

When he joined the Canadiens in 1940, Gorman possessed a hockey resume which already spoke for itself. He had four Stanley Cups to his credit, including a pair earned behind the bench with the Ottawa Senators in 1920 and 1923, one with Chicago in 1934, and another with the Montreal Maroons in 1935. The latter pair of championships made him the only coach in league history to win consecutive Cups with different teams.

Gorman assumed the reins of the Canadiens determined to restore glory to a team that had just missed the playoffs. He wasted no time molding his new club by first having the foresight to hire Dick Irvin as his head coach. His next big move was one which would forever alter the face of the Canadiens. By signing Maurice Richard just prior to the 1942-43 season, Gorman secured the missing piece he was looking for. It didn’t take long for Gorman’s inking of the Rocket to pay dividends, as the Canadiens won the Stanley Cup the following year to snap a 13-year championship drought.

Gorman’s final year as GM was a memorable one, as the Canadiens gave him the perfect sendoff by raising the Cup in the spring of 1946. Over his six seasons with the organization, Gorman led the team to two championships and six postseason appearances.

Gorman was posthumously inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a Builder in 1963.