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Joueurs

BERNARD GEOFFRION (1950-1964)

Bernard
Geoffrion

1952-1963
Position R
Shoots R
Weight 170lbs
Height 5'9"
Date of birth February 14th, 1931
Place of birth Montreal, QC, CAN
Deceased on March 11th, 2006
Seasons - MTL 14
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 766 371 388 759 0 636
1950-1951 18 8 6 14 0 9
1951-1952 67 30 24 54 0 66
1952-1953 65 22 17 39 0 37
1953-1954 54 29 25 54 0 87
1954-1955 70 38 37 75 0 57
1955-1956 59 29 33 62 0 66
1956-1957 41 19 21 40 0 18
1957-1958 42 27 23 50 0 51
1958-1959 59 22 44 66 0 30
1959-1960 59 30 41 71 0 36
1960-1961 64 50 45 95 0 29
1961-1962 62 23 36 59 0 36
1962-1963 51 23 18 41 0 73
1963-1964 55 21 18 39 0 41
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 127 56 59 115 0 88
1950-1951 11 1 1 2 0 6
1951-1952 11 3 1 4 0 6
1952-1953 12 6 4 10 0 12
1953-1954 11 6 5 11 0 18
1954-1955 12 8 5 13 0 8
1955-1956 10 5 9 14 0 6
1956-1957 10 11 7 18 0 2
1957-1958 10 6 5 11 0 2
1958-1959 11 5 8 13 0 10
1959-1960 8 2 10 12 0 4
1960-1961 4 2 1 3 0 0
1961-1962 5 0 1 1 0 6
1962-1963 5 0 1 1 0 4
1963-1964 7 1 1 2 0 4

ONE OF THE MOST REMARKABLE OFFENSIVE FORCES IN HOCKEY, BERNARD GEOFFRION POPULARIZED THE SLAP SHOT, WHICH HAD EARNED HIM THE NICKNAME “BOOM BOOM.”

The number five holds a special place in the hearts of Montreal Canadiens fans who remember the late 1950s for two reasons: the number of consecutive Stanley Cup Championships and the flamboyant right winger with the thunderous shot who wore it on his back.

Drive and desire were the key elements of Geoffrion’s game. He played with his heart on his sleeve and thrived on pressure, coming up with highlight performances when the stakes were at their highest. Throwing caution to the wind, he played an “all-out, all the time” game, the only way he knew how.

“Boom Boom”, who arrived in the league already sporting the nickname that grew out of his heavy slap shot, scored a goal in his first NHL game and recorded seven others in 18 games in 1950-51. He stuck around for the playoffs and was the league’s most heralded newcomer the next fall.

The 1951-52 season set the tone for the career that was to follow, as Geoffrion became one of the league’s marquee players. Curious fans filled rinks around the league, drawn in by tales of the newcomer’s loud, unorthodox shot. Fans went home awed and impressed. Goaltenders went home bruised and humbled.

By the time the schedule came to an end, Geoffrion stood sixth among NHL scorers. His 30 goals were tops on his team and his 54 points were second only to veteran Elmer Lach. The Calder Trophy, awarded to league’s top rookie, went to Geoffrion in 1952.

As Geoffrion continued to develop, the team’s fortunes improved as well. With a powerful wrist shot and accurate backhand to complement his trademark slap shot, Geoffrion climbed to the upper echelons of the scoring list year after year.

For some reason, Geoffrion never seemed to win personal honors in years that the team won the Stanley Cup. In 1953, his name was engraved on the Cup for the first time. Two years later, members of the Canadiens occupied the three top slots on the NHL scoring list. Geoffrion’s 38-goal, 75-point season won him the Art Ross Trophy but the team fell to Detroit in the Finals.

Geoffrion starred as one of the 12 men to play on all five consecutive Stanley Cup winners. He found the twine with his usual regularity, potting 127 regular season markers and 29 more in the postseason, most notably the Cup-winner in the spring of 1958.

While his legend was built around his nose for the net and his booming slap shot, Geoffrion was also a skilled passer and playmaker, usually picking up at least as many - if not more - assists as goals.

Going into the 1960-61 season, only one man had ever scored 50 goals in a single campaign. By the end of the year, “Boom Boom” had become the second man to achieve the feat, matching childhood idol and long-time teammate Maurice Richard’s mark. He had his named engraved a second time on the Art Ross Trophy and was named the NHL’s most valuable player, taking home the coveted Hart Trophy as well.

Some athletes shun the spotlight but Geoffrion thrived in it. Laughing, joking and ready to break into song at the drop of a hat, he was the most-recognized sports figure in Montreal. Invited to perform on nightclub stages, radio and television, he rarely passed up the opportunity.

As popular with his teammates as with the fans, he helped keep things light in the dressing room and livened things up in hotel lobbies and railway coaches around the league. When Boom-Boom was in a good mood, so was everybody else.

The 33-year-old Geoffrion announced his retirement after 1963-64 but returned to play after two years away, suiting up with the New York Rangers.

After coaching in New York and Atlanta, Geoffrion stepped behind the Montreal bench to start the 1979-80 schedule but health problems forced him to resign 30 games into the season.

Geoffrion’s 371 goals in a Montreal uniform put him in sixth place on the all-time list. He ranks ninth for total career points.

Bernard Geoffrion was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1972. He passed away on March 11, 2006, hours before the scheduled retirement of his number. At his insistence, things went ahead, with family, friends and 21,000 fans celebrating “Boom Boom’s” memory as his number 5 was raised to the rafters of the Bell Centre.