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Joueurs

BERT CORBEAU (1914-1922)

Bert
Corbeau

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots R
Weight 200lbs
Height 5'11"
Date of birth February 9th, 1894
Place of birth Penetanguishene, ON, CAN
Deceased on September 21st, 1942
Seasons - MTL 8
Other numbers 3,11
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 167 52 32 84 0 541
1914-1915 18 1 1 2 0 35
1915-1916 24 7 0 7 0 134
1916-1917 19 9 5 14 0 103
1917-1918 21 8 8 16 0 41
1918-1919 16 2 3 5 0 51
1919-1920 23 11 6 17 0 65
1920-1921 24 11 2 13 0 86
1921-1922 22 3 7 10 0 26
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 18 6 3 9 0 85
1915-1916 5 0 0 0 0 35
1916-1917 6 4 1 5 0 22
1917-1918 2 1 1 2 0 11
1918-1919 5 1 1 2 0 17
A 5-foot-11, 200-pounder from Penetanguishene, ON, Albert “Bert” Corbeau spent eight seasons patrolling the Montreal blue line, playing a significant role in the Canadiens’ early successes.

At age 20, he joined the 1914-15 NHA edition of the team, seeing spot duty in his rookie season. Appearing in 18 games, he added a goal and an assist to the score sheet and his Habs finished in last place.

The following season, 1915-16, finished in a much more satisfactory manner for both the defenseman and his team. Seeing regular action in all 24 games, he proved to be adept at leading a rush up the ice, finding the twine seven times, a mark he would match or better in all but two of the other winters he’d spend in Montreal.

Corbeau also showed he knew how to make effective use of his size, leading all Habs with 134 penalty minutes as opponents around the league found out for themselves just how tough he could be when challenged.

At season’s end, Corbeau became one of the first 11 Canadiens players to have their names engraved on the Stanley Cup, as the Habs captured the coveted trophy for the first of a league-record 24 times.

A reputation for rugged play solidified after a 1916-17 season that saw him once again finish tops among Habs with 103 penalty minutes, and Corbeau was able to concentrate on more offensive aspects of the game. A capable playmaker in an era when assists were much rarer than the goals they accompanied, he lit the lamp nine times in the NHA’s final season.

Moving into the NHL with the Canadiens in 1917-18, he hit his career high water mark with 11 the next year as Montreal made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1919. In 1920-21 he repeated with one short of a dozen markers but still managed to lead the NHL with 86 minutes in the sin bin.

Sold to the Hamilton Tigers before the 1922-23 season got underway, Corbeau moved on to the Toronto St. Pats the next season, staying with the team through the 1926-27 season, when they were rechristened as the Maple Leafs.