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Joueurs

BERT OLMSTEAD (1950-1958)

Bert
Olmstead

1952-1963
Position L
Shoots L
Weight 180lbs
Height 6'1"
Date of birth September 4th, 1926
Place of birth Sceptre, SK, CAN
Seasons - MTL 8
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 508 103 280 383 0 609
1950-1951 39 16 22 38 0 50
1951-1952 69 7 28 35 0 49
1952-1953 69 17 28 45 0 83
1953-1954 70 15 37 52 0 85
1954-1955 70 10 48 58 0 103
1955-1956 70 14 56 70 0 94
1956-1957 64 15 33 48 0 74
1957-1958 57 9 28 37 0 71
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 86 8 34 42 0 78
1950-1951 11 2 4 6 0 9
1951-1952 11 0 1 1 0 4
1952-1953 12 2 2 4 0 4
1953-1954 11 0 1 1 0 19
1954-1955 12 0 4 4 0 21
1955-1956 10 4 10 14 0 8
1956-1957 10 0 9 9 0 13
1957-1958 9 0 3 3 0 0

A TIRELESS WORKHORSE FOR THE CANADIENS, BERT OLMSTEAD’S EIGHT POINT OUTING ALLOWED HIM TO SHARE THE RECORD FOR MOST POINTS IN A SINGLE GAME WITH “ROCKET” RICHARD.

Power forwards have been around a lot longer than the term itself. Lean and mean Bert Olmstead did a lot of the heavy lifting on two of the greatest forward lines of all time. A 20-goal scorer with Chicago the year before, Olmstead joined the Canadiens during the 1950-51 season and remade himself into one of hockey’s greatest playmakers.
Coach Dick Irvin ran a tight ship and “Dirty Bertie” – as he was known around the NHL – was a willing member of the crew.

Olmstead’s job was to work the left side of the ice, winning battles along the boards and digging the puck out of the corners to create scoring chances for his teammates. He filled this role as well as any man in the league.

For eight years, he gave everything he had to the Canadiens and expected no less from his teammates. If he felt a player was not offering his best effort, living legend or raw recruit, that man heard about it from Olmstead.

He began his tenure with the Habs alongside Elmer Lach and Maurice Richard and was later assigned youngsters Jean Beliveau and Bernard Geoffrion as playing partners. While he never again reached the 20-goal plateau, Olmstead remained a potent offensive threat while executing his primary role to perfection.

On January 9, 1954, Olmstead caught fire, scoring eight points in a single game to tie the team record set by Maurice Richard a decade earlier. They remain the only Habs to have ever accomplished that feat.

Olmstead contributed 22 assists in 1950-51 and his total continued to climb with each passing year. He led the league with 48 helpers in 1954-55 and set the NHL standard with 56 the next season.

A member of the 1953 Stanley Cup winning squad, Olmstead had his best playoff campaign following the 1955-56 regular season. Playing his habitual, hard nosed style through 10 postseason games, Olmstead picked up 14 points, good for second-best on the team, en route to claiming another Stanley Cup.

The Canadiens would go on to hoist the Cup again the next four consecutive seasons but Olmstead was not around when the drive to five came to an end. Toronto acquired him following the 1957-58 season, expecting the veteran competitor to help turn their fortunes around.

Olmstead’s leadership played a major role in the Maple Leafs’ subsequent resurgence as a contending hockey team. His captured the Stanley Cup a fifth time with the Maple Leafs in 1961-62.

Olmstead retired a Stanley Cup champion but returned as an executive a few years later, becoming the first coach and general manager of the expansion Oakland Seals.

In 1985, the Hockey Hall of Fame opened its doors to Bert Olmstead, recognizing his place among the greatest of all time.