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Joueurs

BOB FILLION (1943-1950)

Bob
Fillion

1952-1963
Position L
Shoots L
Weight 170lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth July 12th, 1921
Place of birth Thetford Mines, QC, CAN
Seasons - MTL 7
Other numbers 5,10,21
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 327 42 61 103 0 84
1943-1944 41 7 23 30 0 14
1944-1945 31 6 8 14 0 12
1945-1946 50 10 6 16 0 12
1946-1947 57 6 3 9 0 16
1947-1948 32 9 9 18 0 8
1948-1949 59 3 9 12 0 14
1949-1950 57 1 3 4 0 8
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 33 7 4 11 0 10
1943-1944 3 0 0 0 0 0
1944-1945 1 3 0 3 0 0
1945-1946 9 4 3 7 0 6
1946-1947 8 0 0 0 0 0
1948-1949 7 0 1 1 0 4
1949-1950 5 0 0 0 0 0
The letter from Canadiens GM Cecil Hart delivered to the Fillion household in 1938 was addressed to Georges, one of seven hockey playing brothers in the Thetford Mines, QC, household.

Deciding he was too old to take a crack at the Habs training camp, he asked a younger brother with a better command of English to reply on his behalf.  Seventeen-year-old Bob Fillion extended Georges’ regrets and mentioned that he was a pretty good hockey player himself. The next invitation was addressed to him.

Assigned to the Verdun Junior Maple Leafs, Fillion began his ascent to the NHL by suiting up alongside future Canadiens teammates Maurice Richard, Butch Bouchard and Paul Bibeault, moving to the senior ranks before the next season had ended and enjoying two seasons with the Quebec Senior Hockey League’s Shawinigan Cataractes.

After spending the 1942-43 season in the military where he wore both a corporal’s uniform and a Canadian Army hockey squad jersey, Fillion broke into the big league to kick off the 1943-44 campaign.

Notching his first NHL goal three games into his seven-year career, Fillion beat Blackhawks netminder, Hec Heighton, in a 5-3 Montreal road win. He would go on to score six others and add 23 assists for the most productive offensive season in Montreal, capping his rookie season with a Stanley Cup Championship.

Settling into a role as one of the league’s most skilled defensive forwards, Fillion, who usually played the left wing on a line with Murph Chamberlain and Ken Mosdell, used speed and positioning rather than bulk and brawn to counter the top right wingers in the league.

Lighting the lamp 10 times in 1945-46, his career best as a marksman, the 5-foot-10 forward continued his run in the postseason. Potting four more goals and adding three assists, the shifty forward finished the playoffs fourth in team scoring, right behind the three “Punch Line” snipers.

After leaving the Canadiens, Fillion spent the 1950-51 season in the QSHL, playing on a line with two of his brothers before hanging his skates up for good.