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Joueurs

BOBBY ROUSSEAU (1960-1970)

Bobby
Rousseau

1952-1963
Position R
Shoots R
Weight 178lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth July 26th, 1940
Place of birth Montreal, QC, CAN
Seasons - MTL 10
Other numbers 24
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 643 200 322 522 42 317
1960-1961 15 1 2 3 0 4
1961-1962 70 21 24 45 0 26
1962-1963 62 19 18 37 0 15
1963-1964 70 25 31 56 0 32
1964-1965 66 12 35 47 0 26
1965-1966 70 30 48 78 0 20
1966-1967 68 19 44 63 0 58
1967-1968 74 19 46 65 12 47
1968-1969 76 30 40 70 27 59
1969-1970 72 24 34 58 3 30
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 78 16 29 45 0 54
1961-1962 6 0 2 2 0 0
1962-1963 5 0 1 1 0 2
1963-1964 7 1 1 2 0 2
1964-1965 13 5 8 13 0 24
1965-1966 10 4 4 8 0 6
1966-1967 10 1 7 8 0 4
1967-1968 13 2 4 6 0 8
1968-1969 14 3 2 5 0 8

AS COMFORTABLE FEEDING HIS TEAMMATES AS HE WAS MAKING A BIG PLAY, BOBBY ROUSSEAU WAS ONE OF THE KEY COMPONENTS OF THE CANADIENS’ STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONSHIP IN 1965.

At 15, Bobby Rousseau won the Quebec Junior Hockey League’s scoring title. At 17, guided by Scotty Bowman, he was a Memorial Cup champion with the Hull-Ottawa Canadiens. At the tender age of 19, he returned home from the 1960 Olympic Winter Games in Squaw Valley, California with a silver medal.

Rousseau broke in with the Habs during the 1960-61 season, playing in 15 games. Both of his older brothers had suited up briefly for the team in past years, but the youngest of the three would eclipse his siblings, appearing in over 700 games in addition to winning four Stanley Cups.

A quick and talented player with a nose for the net, Rousseau scored 21 goals in 1961-62, a feat that helped earn him the Calder Trophy as rookie of the year.

Always a sniper, if Rousseau got one goal, others often followed. Such was the case on February 1, 1964, when he slipped five pucks past Detroit’s netminder. Breaking the 20-goal plateau five times in his nine years with Montreal, Rousseau picked up 200 regular season goals as a Hab. Twice, he finished the year with 30 goals to his credit.

Rousseau’s offensive game was not limited to burying the puck behind the opposing goaltender. He was also an effective playmaker, feeding teammates for 322 assists.

A strong skater and solid puck handler, Rousseau could more than hold his own in a defensive capacity, shadowing the opposition when playing against top scoring lines and often leading shorthanded rushes up the ice.

The first of Rousseau’s Stanley Cup Championships came in the spring of 1965. After a disappointing 12-goal regular season, the right-winger caught fire in the playoffs. Second on the score sheet only to team captain Jean Beliveau, he averaged a point per night over the 13 games leading up to the parade along Ste. Catherine Street.

Rousseau continued his torrid pace the following year, which also ended with a procession through the city. He led the team in scoring and led the league in assists. He also finished second in the race for the Art Ross Trophy, awarded to the NHL’s top point-getter.

The Stanley Cup slipped from the Canadiens’ collective hands in the spring of 1967 but the team recaptured it the two seasons that followed. One of the prime contributors to four Montreal championships in five years, Rousseau left the Canadiens after the 1969-70 season. He played one year with Minnesota and four more with the New York Rangers before calling it a career.

An avid golfer, Rousseau swapped his sticks for clubs. Just as it had in hockey, his dedication and determination paid off. Once one of Quebec’s top golf professionals, he now owns and operates a course in Louiseville, an hour’s drive from Montreal.