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Joueurs

CHRIS CHELIOS (1983-1990)

Chris
Chelios

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots R
Weight 191lbs
Height 6'1"
Date of birth January 25th, 1962
Place of birth Chicago, IL, USA
Seasons - MTL 7
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 402 72 237 309 74 783
1983-1984 12 0 2 2 -5 12
1984-1985 74 9 55 64 11 87
1985-1986 41 8 26 34 4 67
1986-1987 71 11 33 44 -5 124
1987-1988 71 20 41 61 14 172
1988-1989 80 15 58 73 35 185
1989-1990 53 9 22 31 20 136
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 98 16 52 68 8 186
1983-1984 15 1 9 10 3 17
1984-1985 9 2 8 10 2 17
1985-1986 20 2 9 11 3 49
1986-1987 17 4 9 13 -1 38
1987-1988 11 3 1 4 3 29
1988-1989 21 4 15 19 2 28
1989-1990 5 0 1 1 -4 8
Considered one of the best American players in NHL history, defenseman Chris Chelios has played more regular season games than any other active player. In fact, only the legendary Gordie Howe has taken part in more games over the course of his career.

An offense-minded defenseman known for his rugged playing style, Chelios modified his game over the course of his career to become a stalwart defender, consistently placing among the league’s plus/minus leaders.

Chosen 40th overall by the Canadiens in the second round of the 1981 NHL Entry Draft, Chelios didn’t take long in establishing himself in Montreal after spending two seasons with the University of Wisconsin and another with the U.S. National Team.

Chelios set a pair of team records for rookie defensemen in 1984-85, his first full season with the Habs. He established those new marks with 55 assists and 64 points, the latter placing him third overall among the team’s scoring leaders that season. The breakout campaign also earned him the first of his 11 All-Star Game selections.

With Larry Robinson serving as his mentor, the talented young defenseman developed his game further over the course of the following seasons, winning his first Stanley Cup in the spring of 1986.
 
Chelios took his play to a whole new level in 1988-89, finishing the season with a career-high 73 points (which he would go on to match in 1992-93). He also posted a plus-35 differential, which helped him earn his first Norris Trophy as the league’s best defenseman.

One of only five Canadiens defensemen to score 20 or more goals in a season, Chelios remains the last Montreal defender named to the NHL First All-Star Team and the team’s most recent Norris Trophy winner.

Habs fans clearly recall Chelios' devastating bodycheck on Philadelphia forward Brian Propp, a playoff hit that led Flyers goalie Ron Hextall to seek revenge on behalf of his teammate.

Chelios made history in 1989-90 as he and Guy Carbonneau became the Canadiens' first co-captains.

His career went in a new direction in the summer of 1990 when he was traded to Chicago in exchange for center Denis Savard. Chelios spent nine seasons with his hometown Blackhawks, claiming the Norris two more times with Chicago before he was traded to Detroit in 1999. Renowned for his remarkable physical fitness, he capped off the 2007-08 season with the Red Wings at the age of 46 with his third Stanley Cup.

In addition to his outstanding NHL career, Chelios has remained a faithful member of the U.S. National Team. He was a member of the American team that won the 1996 World Cup and has taken part in four Olympics, three as team captain, including 2002 when the United States claimed a silver medal on home ice in Salt Lake City.