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Joueurs

DENIS SAVARD (1990-1993)

Denis
Savard

1952-1963
Position C
Shoots R
Weight 175lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth February 4th, 1961
Place of birth Pointe Gatineau, QC, CAN
Seasons - MTL 3
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 210 72 107 179 6 215
1990-1991 70 28 31 59 -1 52
1991-1992 77 28 42 70 6 73
1992-1993 63 16 34 50 1 90
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 38 5 25 30 -3 47
1990-1991 13 2 11 13 -1 35
1991-1992 11 3 9 12 1 8
1992-1993 14 0 5 5 -3 4

ONE OF THE NHL’S BIGGEST STARS IN THE 1980S, CENTER DENIS SAVARD WON THE ONLY STANLEY CUP OF HIS CAREER WITH THE CANADIENS IN 1993.

Playing in an era when Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux commanded all the attention, Denis Savard earned his place among the great NHL players of his time. Despite his small stature, Savard’s speed and deking abilities led to spectacular rushes that made him one of the most prolific centers of his day. Those who saw him play readily conjure up an image of one of his spin-o-ramas, a play that saw him spin around completely while protecting the puck in order to get by opposing defensemen and goalies.

Chosen third overall by Chicago in the first round of the 1980 draft, Savard starred with the Blackhawks for a decade before he was traded to Montreal in June 1990 for Chris Chelios and a second round draft pick.

Despite having his best years behind him, including five 100-point seasons during his 10 years in the Windy City, the Pointe-Gatineau native finished his first season with the Canadiens third overall in team scoring with 59 points. He relived his glory days in the playoffs with 13 points in 13 games before Montreal was eliminated by Boston in the Division Final.

Savard became a key part of Montreal’s offense in 1991-92 contributing 70 points, second on the team only to Kirk Muller. Unfortunately for Savard and his teammates, their season once again came to an end at the hands of the Bruins.

His third season with the Canadiens proved to be the charm for Savard. No longer counted on to carry the team’s offense with the additions of Vincent Damphousse and Brian Bellows, Savard still was able to surpass the 50-point plateau for the final time in his career. Slowed by injuries in the playoffs, he came out of the lineup after the opening game of the Stanley Cup Final. Determined to find a way to keep Savard’s enthusiasm on the bench, head coach Jacques Demers made the veteran center an assistant coach for the rest of the series. Montreal defeated the Los Angeles Kings in five games and Savard hoisted the Stanley Cup for the first and only time in his brilliant career.

A free agent, Savard signed with Tampa Bay prior to 1993-94. The following year, he was traded back to the city that revered him, Chicago, where he played two more years before retiring on June 26, 1997. He ended his career with over 1,300 points, one of only 29 players in NHL history to accomplish that feat.

The Blackhawks retired his No. 18 jersey on March 19, 1998. Denis Savard was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame in November 2000.

He became an assistant coach with the Blackhawks in 1998 and remained in that position until 2006, when he was named the team’s head coach, a post he held until October 2008.