NHL Network
This content requires Adobe Flash Player 10

Joueurs

ELMER LACH (1940-1954)

Elmer
Lach

1952-1963
Position C
Shoots L
Weight 165lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth January 22nd, 1918
Place of birth Nokomis, SK, CAN
Seasons - MTL 14
Other numbers 10,14
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 664 215 408 623 0 478
1940-1941 43 7 14 21 0 16
1941-1942 1 0 1 1 0 0
1942-1943 45 18 40 58 0 14
1943-1944 48 24 48 72 0 23
1944-1945 50 26 54 80 0 37
1945-1946 50 13 34 47 0 34
1946-1947 31 14 16 30 0 22
1947-1948 60 30 31 61 0 72
1948-1949 36 11 18 29 0 59
1949-1950 64 15 33 48 0 33
1950-1951 65 21 24 45 0 48
1951-1952 70 15 50 65 0 36
1952-1953 53 16 25 41 0 56
1953-1954 48 5 20 25 0 28
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 76 19 45 64 0 36
1940-1941 3 1 0 1 0 0
1942-1943 5 2 4 6 0 6
1943-1944 9 2 11 13 0 4
1944-1945 6 4 4 8 0 2
1945-1946 9 5 12 17 0 4
1948-1949 1 0 0 0 0 4
1949-1950 5 1 2 3 0 4
1950-1951 11 2 2 4 0 2
1951-1952 11 1 2 3 0 4
1952-1953 12 1 6 7 0 6
1953-1954 4 0 2 2 0 0

ONE-THIRD OF THE FAMOUS “PUNCH LINE”, ELMER LACH, AN EXCEPTIONAL PLAYMAKER, EARNED THE FIRST ART ROSS TROPHY IN 1948.

In the fall of 1940, a young center from Saskatchewan boarded a train heading east. His destination was the Canadiens’ training camp in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. Elmer Lach made the team and has been a Montrealer ever since.

Spending his entire career under the direction of Dick Irvin, Lach played 14 years of the hardnosed brand of hockey that distinguished the NHL play of his era. When he went into the corners for the puck, Lach almost invariably emerged with it, often leaving opponents with a painful memory of the encounter.

In 1943-44, Lach was assigned new linemates. With veteran Toe Blake on one wing and a reputedly brittle youngster named Maurice Richard on the other, “The Punch Line” set the standard for talent and toughness. With their big line firing on all cylinders and the supporting cast following their example, the Habs became the class of the league, winning the Stanley Cup in both 1944 and 1946.

Lach quickly established himself as hockey’s top playmaker, doing the heavy lifting and effortlessly making the puck appear on his linemates’ sticks. On February 6, 1943, he picked up six assists in an 8-3 win over Boston. No member of the Habs since Lach has bettered the feat.

The year “Rocket” Richard scored 50 goals in 50 games, Elmer Lach set an NHL record with 54 assists. He also won the scoring title and was presented with the Hart Trophy, as league MVP.

When he won the NHL scoring title for a second time in 1947-48, Lach was named the first recipient of the newly created Art Ross Trophy.

Lach asked for no quarter and gave none, be it in practice or against other teams. He paid the price for his approach to the game without complaint or recrimination, despite suffering a number of career-threatening injuries.

Lach’s second season ended minutes into the first game of the year when he went down with an elbow injury. In later years, he suffered a broken cheekbone and a fractured skull. All told, Lach missed over 150 games due to injury, averaging to one out of every five games.

After scoring the Cup-winning goal in 1953, Lach collided with Richard in a memorable celebratory airborne embrace that left him starting his summer sporting a broken nose.

Following the 1953-54 season, Lach retired, embarking on a successful business career shortly thereafter. When he left the ice, it was as the NHL’s all-time leader for assists and total points. Over a half century after hanging up his skates, Lach is still among the top 10 all-time Canadiens in both categories.

The only surviving member of “The Punch Line”, Lach is one of the few remaining links to hockey’s Golden Age. Congenial by nature and with gratitude for all the game has done for him, he fills the role with dignity and grace.

On December 4, 2009, the day of the 100th anniversary of the Canadiens, his famous number 16 was retired.