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Joueurs

GEORGES MANTHA (1928-1941)

Georges
Mantha

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots L
Weight 165lbs
Height 5'7"
Date of birth November 29th, 1908
Place of birth Lachine, QC, CAN
Deceased on January 25th, 1990
Seasons - MTL 13
Other numbers 10,11,12
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 488 89 102 191 0 148
1928-1929 21 0 0 0 0 8
1929-1930 44 5 2 7 0 16
1930-1931 44 11 6 17 0 25
1931-1932 48 1 7 8 0 8
1932-1933 43 3 6 9 0 10
1933-1934 44 6 9 15 0 12
1934-1935 42 12 10 22 0 14
1935-1936 35 1 12 13 0 14
1936-1937 47 13 14 27 0 17
1937-1938 47 23 19 42 0 12
1938-1939 25 5 5 10 0 6
1939-1940 42 9 11 20 0 6
1940-1941 6 0 1 1 0 0
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 36 6 2 8 0 24
1928-1929 3 0 0 0 0 0
1929-1930 6 0 0 0 0 8
1930-1931 10 5 1 6 0 4
1931-1932 4 0 1 1 0 8
1934-1935 2 0 0 0 0 4
1936-1937 5 0 0 0 0 0
1937-1938 3 1 0 1 0 0
1938-1939 3 0 0 0 0 0

EQUALLY ABLE TO PLAY ON THE BACK END OR UP FRONT, GEORGES MANTHA JOINED BROTHER SYLVIO AND THE CANADIENS IN 1928, HIS FIRST OF 12 SEASONS IN MONTREAL.

Born in Lachine, Quebec in 1908, Georges Mantha, half of one of hockey’s first brother acts, spent a dozen complete seasons with the Canadiens in the early decades of the NHL.

Comfortable at either forward or defense, depending where the team needed him the most, the 5-foot-7, 165-pound Mantha was a skilled skater with a powerful shot who was called upon to fill a defensive role for most of his career.

After spending several winters suiting up for a Bell Telephone entry in one of the many senior leagues that flourished at the time, Mantha cracked the Habs’ lineup in 1928-29, joining older brother Sylvio, who was already an established veteran in the 10-team NHL.

Impressive in the 21 games he played that season, Mantha graduated to full-time status the next year, appearing in all 44 games and scoring five goals along the way. Playing on a line charged with countering hockey’s top sharp-shooters, Mantha helped hold Boston’s offense to a mere three goals in the Finals as Montreal swept away the heavily favored Bruins to win the 1930 Stanley Cup.

The following year, Mantha maintained his defensive excellence and also managed to make the most of his scoring chances. He followed an 11-goal regular season with five playoff markers, playing a big role in his second Stanley Cup title in as many years.

Playing in an era where referees turned a blind eye more often than they do today, Mantha stood out from the crowd with his clean play. Using speed, agility and anticipation, his game was built on brains and talent rather than more primitive tactics that were the signature style of many around the league.

Most seasons, Mantha played a largely defensive role but when circumstances dictated, he quickly adjusted his play. Howie Morenz’s trade to Chicago left a big hole up front but when asked to fill it, Mantha came through. He potted 13 goals in 1936-37 and followed it up with a career high 23 the next season, leading the team with 42 points.

In 488 games with the Montreal Canadiens, Mantha scored 89 goals and assisted on 102 others. Always a gentlemanly player, he spent only 148 minutes in the penalty box.

After leaving hockey, Mantha spent many years actively involved in amateur and youth sports, eventually becoming the city of Montreal’s Assistant Director for Sports.

He is credited with suggesting that Jarry Park would make a suitable temporary home for a baseball team when promoters where looking for a home for a franchise that would later become the Expos.

Georges Mantha died in 1990 at the age of 81. One of Montreal’s largest recreation complexes features two surfaces, which bear the names of both Mantha brothers.