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Joueurs

GUY LAFLEUR (1971-1985)

Guy
Lafleur

1952-1963
Position R
Shoots R
Weight 185lbs
Height 6'0"
Date of birth September 20th, 1951
Place of birth Thurso, QC, CAN
Seasons - MTL 14
Seasons - NHL 17
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 961 518 728 1246 477 381
1971-1972 73 29 35 64 27 48
1972-1973 69 28 27 55 16 51
1973-1974 73 21 35 56 10 29
1974-1975 70 53 66 119 52 37
1975-1976 80 56 69 125 68 36
1976-1977 80 56 80 136 89 20
1977-1978 78 60 72 132 73 26
1978-1979 80 52 77 129 56 28
1979-1980 74 50 75 125 40 12
1980-1981 51 27 43 70 24 29
1981-1982 66 27 57 84 33 24
1982-1983 68 27 49 76 6 12
1983-1984 80 30 40 70 -14 19
1984-1985 19 2 3 5 -3 10
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 124 57 76 133 0 67
1971-1972 6 1 4 5 0 2
1972-1973 17 3 5 8 0 9
1973-1974 6 0 1 1 0 4
1974-1975 11 12 7 19 0 15
1975-1976 13 7 10 17 0 2
1976-1977 14 9 17 26 0 6
1977-1978 15 10 11 21 0 16
1978-1979 16 10 13 23 0 0
1979-1980 3 3 1 4 0 0
1980-1981 3 0 1 1 0 2
1981-1982 5 2 1 3 0 4
1982-1983 3 0 2 2 0 2
1983-1984 12 0 3 3 0 5

NICKNAMED “THE BLOND DEMON”, GUY LAFLEUR’S INCREDIBLE RUSHES AND LETHAL SHOT MADE HIM THE MOST FEARED FORWARD OF HIS ERA.

Not since Jean Béliveau 20 years earlier had a youngster’s arrival been as eagerly anticipated by Canadiens supporters as Guy Lafleur’s. Lafleur thrilled fans with a career that ranks among the greatest of all-time, his speed, skill and pride epitomizing the qualities that made the Montreal Canadiens of the 1970s the class of the NHL.

The top junior player in the country, Lafleur finished his amateur career at the top of the heap. His Quebec Remparts won the 1971 Memorial Cup, with the youngster from Thurso already one of Quebec’s top sports figures, having recorded 130 goals and 209 points in his last amateur season.

Just as Frank Selke had done 20 years earlier, Habs General Manager Sam Pollock went to great lengths to ensure that things worked out as they should, trading several skilled players to guarantee the youngster would enter the NHL wearing the colors of the Montreal Canadiens.

Chosen first overall in the 1971 Amateur Draft, Lafleur’s every move on the ice was observed, commented on and compared to the play of the legends who preceded him by the most demanding fans in the league.

Lafleur scored 29 goals in his rookie year, 28 the next, the same year his name was added to the Stanley Cup for the first time, and 21 in his third season. Respectable results for most youngsters to be sure, but short of what the Forum faithful were hoping for from the kid who was expected to carry forward the torch that Maurice Richard passed on to Jean Beliveau.

“The Flower”, as he was known to teammates, blossomed in 1974-75, more than doubling the previous season’s numbers with 53 goals and 66 assists. The grumblings from the stands that had been associated with his efforts in previous years were gone, replaced with cheers from packed houses as Lafleur, now referred to as “Le Démon Blond” in some quarters, emerged as the single most exciting player in the league.

As the Montreal Canadiens enjoyed success unseen since the 1950s, winning four consecutive titles from 1976 through the end of the decade, Lafleur led the way, with both his scoring numbers and his strength of character. Nothing came before the game, as Lafleur dedicated himself to a single objective: having his team come out on top every night.

Dressed and ready to go hours before the puck dropped, the sight of Lafleur in full flight, the puck on his stick and shaggy locks flying in his jet stream as he led a dazzling rush, made highlight packages around North America. Televisions were flooded with images of him being mobbed by teammates, celebrating yet another goal as he reeled off six consecutive seasons that saw him break the 50-goal barrier.

The double and sometimes triple coverage he was assigned by opposing coaches left teammates open to receive his crisp passes. Steve Shutt, who spent a decade on Lafleur’s left wing, was a prime beneficiary as Lafleur managed even more assists than goals year after year. One season before Lafleur accomplished the feat himself, Shutt scored 60 goals, many of them made possible by some of Lafleur’s staggering 80 assists in 1976-77.

Lafleur accumulated an impressive array of individual awards to accompany his five Stanley Cup Championships. In 1976, he began a three-year domination of both the Art Ross Trophy, given to the NHL’s top scorer, and the Pearson Trophy, awarded to the league’s top performer by his playing peers.

The spring of 1977 saw Lafleur win the first of two consecutive Hart Trophies, awarded to the NHL’s most valuable player. His 26 playoff points earned Lafleur the Conn Smythe Trophy as the postseason MVP and paved the way to that year’s Stanley Cup parade.

Shortly after the 1984-85 season got underway, Lafleur shocked the hockey world with the news that he had decided to retire. He left the game with 518 regular season goals, a total second only to Maurice Richard’s 544. His 728 assists and 1,246 points in regular season competition lead all Habs.

Inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1988, Lafleur returned the next season. He suited up with the Rangers and Nordiques until 1990-91, becoming the second player after Gordie Howe to play in the NHL after being enshrined in the Hall of Fame.

A successful businessman and one of five Montreal Canadiens Ambassadors, Guy Lafleur watched while fans chanted “Guy! Guy! Guy!” as the number 10 that he wore for over 1,000 games was raised to the Forum rafters on February 16, 1985.