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Joueurs

JEAN-CLAUDE TREMBLAY (1959-1972)

Jean-Claude
Tremblay

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots L
Date of birth January 22nd, 1939
Place of birth Port Alfred, QC, CAN
Deceased on December 7th, 1994
Seasons - MTL 13
Other numbers 21
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 794 57 306 363 130 204
1959-1960 11 0 1 1 0 0
1960-1961 29 1 3 4 0 18
1961-1962 70 3 17 20 0 18
1962-1963 69 1 17 18 0 10
1963-1964 70 5 16 21 0 24
1964-1965 68 3 17 20 0 22
1965-1966 59 6 29 35 0 8
1966-1967 60 8 26 34 0 14
1967-1968 73 4 26 30 28 18
1968-1969 75 7 32 39 29 18
1969-1970 58 2 19 21 5 7
1970-1971 76 11 52 63 16 23
1971-1972 76 6 51 57 52 24
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 108 14 51 65 0 58
1960-1961 5 0 0 0 0 2
1961-1962 6 0 2 2 0 2
1962-1963 5 0 0 0 0 0
1963-1964 7 2 1 3 0 9
1964-1965 13 1 9 10 0 18
1965-1966 10 2 9 11 0 2
1966-1967 10 2 4 6 0 2
1967-1968 13 3 6 9 0 2
1968-1969 13 1 4 5 0 6
1970-1971 20 3 14 17 0 15
1971-1972 6 0 2 2 0 0

A MOBILE DEFENSEMAN WITH A SMOOTH SKATING STRIDE, JEAN-CLAUDE TREMBLAY SPARKLED AS THE TEAM’S POWER PLAY QUARTERBACK FOR 11 SEASONS IN MONTREAL.

Jean-Claude Tremblay patrolled the Montreal blue line for over a decade, earning five Stanley Cup Championships along the way. The Bagotville, Quebec native first attracted attention as a 17-year old, potting 71 goals in the 1956-57 campaign.

He finished his junior career with the Hull-Ottawa Canadiens, coached by a young Scotty Bowman and managed by Sam Pollock. Featuring a lineup littered with future Habs, the Hull-Ottawa squad won the 1958 Memorial Cup. By that time, Tremblay was a defenseman converted to left wing when teammate Claude Ruel suffered a career-ending eye injury.

After playing portions of the schedule with the big club the two previous years, Tremblay made the opening night roster for the 1961-62 season. When he left 11 years later, Tremblay was one of the NHL’s premier performers.

A superb skater – fast, mobile and blessed with innate hockey smarts – Tremblay was an offensive threat able to make precise passes through traffic to teammates in full flight. On December 29, 1962, he picked up four assists in a single period.

Forgoing the more robust style of play preferred by most defensemen, Tremblay rarely lay on the body, going about things with a bit more finesse than most of his peers. A magician with his stick, Tremblay effortlessly stripped enemy forwards of the puck, turning it back up the ice to begin the counter attack.

Agile and elusive, once Tremblay had the puck, rarely did opponents get it back. He quarterbacked the most potent power play in the league and often seemed to kill entire penalties on his own, weaving his way through whole teams for the duration of his team’s penalty.

Dedicated to his craft, Tremblay spent countless hours refining his skills and adding to his bag of tricks. He developed a long lob that he occasionally released from centre ice, sometimes embarrassing unsuspecting goalies.

A regular season stalwart, Tremblay took his game to another level in the playoffs. In 1965, he picked up 10 points en route to his first Stanley Cup. The following year, he went one better as the Habs repeated as Cup Champs.

Tremblay scored three times in the 1967-68 postseason. His last goal clinched the Stanley Cup for the Habs and completed a sweep of the Blues. Montreal met and beat St. Louis the following year as well.

In 1970-71, Tremblay reached scoring heights not seen by a defenseman since Doug Harvey. His 63 points in the regular season combined with another 17 in the playoffs earned him the nickname “J.C. Superstar”, as well as a fifth mention on the Stanley Cup.

The 1971-72 season was Tremblay’s last with the Habs and followed the pattern he had set the year before, with a 57-point harvest.

Retiring after seven seasons with the WHA’s Quebec Nordiques, Tremblay crossed the Atlantic and moved to Switzerland. He rejoined the Canadiens organization in 1985, where he spent a decade as the club’s European scout.

Jean-Claude Tremblay died in 1994, falling victim to kidney cancer at the age of 55.