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Joueurs

JOE BENOIT (1940-1947)

Joe
Benoit

1952-1963
Position R
Shoots R
Weight 160lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth February 27th, 1916
Place of birth St. Albert, AB, CAN
Deceased on October 19th, 1981
Seasons - MTL 5
Other numbers 5
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 185 75 69 144 0 94
1940-1941 45 16 16 32 0 32
1941-1942 46 20 16 36 0 27
1942-1943 49 30 27 57 0 23
1945-1946 39 9 10 19 0 8
1946-1947 6 0 0 0 0 4
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 11 6 3 9 0 11
1940-1941 3 4 0 4 0 2
1941-1942 3 1 0 1 0 5
1942-1943 5 1 3 4 0 4
A pivotal figure with the Trail Smoke Eaters World Championship squad a year earlier, Joe Benoit took the train east to Montreal’s training camp in the fall of 1940, becoming one of several rookies incoming coach Dick Irvin added to a team he was rebuilding from the ground up.

The 24-year-old right winger clicked almost immediately, becoming a Forum fan favorite with his spectacular scoring exploits. After a 16 goal rookie regular season, Benoit bulged the twine four more times in the 1941 postseason, scoring more playoff goals than the rest of his teammates combined.

A 20-goal campaign followed, with Benoit improving the mark to 30 in 1942-43, a season that saw him play alongside Toe Blake and Elmer Lach on a precursor to the legendary Punch Line. The line’s top marksman, Benoit finished second only to Chicago’s Doug Bentley among NHL scorers that winter.

With three full seasons under his belt, Benoit had 66 goals and 125 points to his credit before duty to his country cost him what were potentially the best years of his career and a Stanley Cup Championship, won by the Habs in the spring of 1944.

After giving two years of military service to the Canadian Army during World War II, Benoit returned to answer the call 39 times in the 1945-46 campaign, one that ended with the Canadiens capturing the Stanley Cup for the second time in three years.

Benoit suited up for six games with the Habs the next season, his final appearances in the NHL, and spent the bulk of the year with the AHL Springfield Indians.

His final game as a player came in a Montreal Royals uniform early in the 1948-49 season, a formality that cleared the way for Benoit to step behind the bench to coach the Western Hockey League’s Spokane Flyers.