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Joueurs

JOE MALONE (1917-1924)

Joe
Malone

1952-1963
Position C
Shoots L
Weight 150lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth February 28th, 1890
Place of birth Quebec City, QC, CAN
Deceased on May 15th, 1969
Seasons - MTL 4
Other numbers 9,11
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 58 52 6 58 0 35
1917-1918 20 44 4 48 0 30
1918-1919 8 7 2 9 0 3
1922-1923 20 1 0 1 0 2
1923-1924 10 0 0 0 0 0
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 9 6 2 8 0 6
1917-1918 2 1 0 1 0 3
1918-1919 5 5 2 7 0 3
1922-1923 2 0 0 0 0 0

ONE OF THE FIRST PURE GOAL-SCORERS IN LEAGUE HISTORY, JOE MALONE HELD THE ALL-TIME RECORD FOR MARKERS IN A SEASON FOR NEARLY 30 YEARS.

Joe Malone broke into the NHL with a bang. On the first night of the new league’s inaugural season, he scored five goals in a 7-4 Canadiens victory over the Ottawa Senators.

One of the game’s premiere marksmen, Malone began his professional career when hockey was still played with seven players a side. He signed on with his hometown Quebec Bulldogs in 1909 and within two years, had become a force to be reckoned with.

Malone played cleanly, avoiding the more barbaric facets of the game as it was often practiced in its infancy. Known as “Phantom” Joe Malone due to his uncanny ability to slip undetected past opposing defensemen, he quickly became one of the most respected players of the early 20th century.

By the time the NHL was formed, Malone had already been part of Stanley Cup-winning teams in 1913 and 1914 with the NHA’s Quebec Bulldogs. Unable to participate in the new league after losing a number of players to World War I, the Bulldogs closed up shop. Their remaining personnel was divided among the four founding teams.

Malone landed in Montreal with the Canadiens and set the new league ablaze from the outset. Playing with Newsy Lalonde and Didier Pitre, he led the league in scoring, potting 44 goals over the 20-game schedule. It was a mark that stood until Maurice Richard’s 50-goal season nearly 30 years later.

Malone set an ongoing team record in 1917-18 when he went on a 14-game scoring streak, piling up 35 goals before he was finally held off the scoresheet. In seven games that season, Malone left the rink with at least three goals to his credit.

Two years after suspending operations, the Quebec Bulldogs joined the NHL and Malone returned to his hometown. Just as he had in Montreal, Malone made a regular habit of finding the back of the net. His success was never more evident than on January 31, 1920, when he scored an NHL record seven goals in a 10-6 victory over Toronto. That amazing feat remains a league benchmark to this day.

Malone led the NHL in scoring that year, picking up 49 points for the financially-troubled Quebec franchise and moved with the team when it relocated to Hamilton and became the Tigers. He did double duty as both player and coach for two years before moving back to Montreal and rejoining the Canadiens.

Malone saw spot duty with the Habs for two seasons and retired after appearing in 10 games in the 1923-24 campaign, one that saw the Canadiens hoist their second Stanley Cup.

The Hockey Hall of Fame inducted Malone in 1950, officially recognizing his stature as one of hockey’s first outstanding snipers.

Joe Malone passed away in 1969 at the age of 79.