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Joueurs

JOHN FERGUSON (1963-1971)

John
Ferguson

1952-1963
Position L
Shoots L
Weight 190lbs
Height 5'11"
Date of birth September 5th, 1938
Place of birth Vancouver, BC, CAN
Deceased on July 14th, 2007
Seasons - MTL 8
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 500 145 158 303 61 1214
1963-1964 59 18 27 45 0 125
1964-1965 69 17 27 44 0 156
1965-1966 65 11 14 25 0 153
1966-1967 67 20 22 42 0 177
1967-1968 61 15 18 33 18 117
1968-1969 71 29 23 52 30 185
1969-1970 48 19 13 32 11 139
1970-1971 60 16 14 30 2 162
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 85 20 18 38 0 260
1963-1964 7 0 1 1 0 25
1964-1965 13 3 1 4 0 28
1965-1966 10 2 0 2 0 44
1966-1967 10 4 2 6 0 22
1967-1968 13 3 5 8 0 25
1968-1969 14 4 3 7 0 80
1970-1971 18 4 6 10 0 36

JOHN FERGUSON WAS ONE OF THE MOST FEARED PLAYERS IN THE LEAGUE, A TITLE HE WOULD BEAR RIGHT UNTIL THE DAY HE RETIRED.

Twelve seconds into his NHL debut, John Ferguson had been awarded his first fighting penalty. By the time the contest ended, he had also added two goals and an assist to his lifetime stats.

Named to the team to start the 1963-64 season, the Habs looked to the 25-year-old rookie to add toughness to their lineup and he did not disappoint. Named runner-up for the Calder Trophy as rookie of the year, the 5-foot-11, 190-pounder served notice that there was a new cop on the beat. No longer would opponents be permitted to take liberties with the Montreal Canadiens’ star players. John Bowie Ferguson quickly became the most feared man in the league, retaining the distinction until his retirement eight years later.

“Fergy” had but one mission on the ice: to help carry the Canadiens to victory. A lot of men have claimed that they would go through a wall for their team. In John Ferguson’s case, it was no exaggeration. Strong, skilled, canny, fearless and mean, Ferguson neither expected nor gave any quarter.

Hockey was a war for Ferguson and he put every weapon at his disposal towards emerging victorious. With intensity and pugilistic ability reminiscent of Eddie Shore, Ferguson dropped his gloves and regularly administered punishment to those who stepped across the line in their dealings with his teammates. It was not unheard of for him to stage the occasional pre-emptive strike, erasing the line completely.

Hostilities extended well beyond the limits imposed by the game clock. He walked out of restaurants rather than breathe the same air as the enemy and crossed the street rather than cross paths with opponents. Other players were beginning to socialize, if only in the offseason, with men who wore different uniforms but Ferguson steadfastly refused to fraternize.

Best known for the reputation he built using his bare hands, Ferguson could also take care of business with the gloves on. On a team loaded with natural scorers, “Fergy” posed an offensive threat. He finished among the team’s top 10 scorers in each of his seasons with the Habs, four times finishing in the top five. Ferguson scored 29 goals in 1968-69, a season that saw him pick up a career high 185 penalty minutes and notch the Stanley Cup-winning goal.

Ferguson’s toughness played a large part in the five Stanley Cup Championships the Canadiens won between 1965 and 1971, re-establishing the team as the class of the league. Ferguson retired after the victory parade in the spring of 1971 and served as second-in-command for Team Canada’s 1972 Summit Series against the Soviets. A few guys on the team shared his “take no prisoners” philosophy. Without their robust contributions, the outcome might well have been different.

Ferguson returned to the NHL during the 1975-76 season. Named General Manager of the Rangers, he also coached the team for the next season and a half and spent a decade directing the fortunes of the Winnipeg Jets. After a stint in the Ottawa Senators’ front office, Ferguson moved on to a scouting role with the San Jose Sharks.

His son, John Ferguson Jr., played four seasons in the AHL and served as the general manager of the Toronto Maple Leafs until January 2008.

After a lengthy battle with cancer, John Ferguson passed away at the age of 68 on July 14, 2007.