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Joueurs

KEN REARDON (1940-1950)

Ken
Reardon

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots L
Weight 180lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth April 1st, 1921
Place of birth Winnipeg, MB, CAN
Seasons - MTL 7
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 341 26 96 122 0 604
1940-1941 34 2 8 10 0 41
1941-1942 41 3 12 15 0 93
1945-1946 43 5 4 9 0 45
1946-1947 52 5 17 22 0 84
1947-1948 58 7 15 22 0 129
1948-1949 46 3 13 16 0 103
1949-1950 67 1 27 28 0 109
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 31 2 5 7 0 62
1940-1941 3 0 0 0 0 4
1941-1942 3 0 0 0 0 4
1945-1946 9 1 1 2 0 4
1946-1947 7 1 2 3 0 20
1948-1949 7 0 0 0 0 18
1949-1950 2 0 2 2 0 12

DEFENSEMAN KEN REARDON WAS A RUGGED ENFORCER, FEARED THROUGHOUT THE NHL.

Tough, strong and determined, Winnipeg native Ken Reardon was one of a half-dozen rookies who suited up for new coach Dick Irvin on opening night of the 1940-41 season. From there, the 5-foot-10, 180-pound rearguard’s relationship with the Montreal Canadiens would extend over the next quarter century.

For seven NHL seasons, all with the Habs, Reardon was one of the league’s most ferocious competitors, a rock-ribbed defenseman who would go to any length to help his team come out on top.

Never a speedster or elegant skater, Reardon knew that the shortest distance from one point to another is a straight line. Able to anticipate the play, he usually managed to be at the right place at the right time, often making a significant impact in the process.

A devastating body-checker and one of the strongest men in the game, Reardon carved out a reputation as someone to be avoided. There was a price to pay for intruding on his territory and very few trespassers got away without paying the consequences.

As handy with his gloves dropped as he was when they were firmly gripping his stick, Reardon played the role of enforcer when things got rambunctious. His attempts at mediation went largely unappreciated by referees and Reardon was habitually among the league leaders in penalty minutes.

Even when he was carrying the puck, Reardon posed a threat to his opponents, frequently preferring to skate through them than around them when leading rushes out of the Montreal end.

Reardon’s brother, Terry, was a teammate in Montreal during the 1941-42 season, the last year before Ken became one of the first NHLers to enlist in World War II. While serving with the RCAF, Reardon played for an Ottawa military team before being deployed to Europe. Even overseas, he managed to continue playing hockey every once in a while.

Upon returning to civilian life, Reardon quickly found his way back to the Forum, though the number 4 he had worn before his military service was no longer available upon his return. Reardon was assigned number 17, which he wore for the remainder of his career.
With Reardon as effective as ever on the blue line, the Habs went all the way in the spring of 1946 and the defenseman hoisted the only Stanley Cup of his career.

Still young, Reardon retired at age 30, a victim of his many years of robust play and the inevitable injuries that resulted. His playing career over, he remained with the Canadiens organization for the next 15 years.

Reardon climbed the administrative ladder, eventually becoming one of the team’s vice-presidents. He began as a scout, sniffing out young prospects before rising through the ranks to become Frank Selke’s right hand man. Reardon negotiated contracts, signed players and operated teams in the extensive Montreal farm system. No stranger to disciplinary proceedings, he represented Maurice “Rocket” Richard in several hearings before NHL President Clarence Campbell.

Reardon retired from the Montreal Canadiens in 1964. A hard-nosed competitor, dedicated team player and prototypical hockey policeman, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966.

After battling an incurable illness, Ken Reardon passed away on March 15, 2008, at the age of 86.