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Joueurs

MARCEL BONIN (1957-1962)

Marcel
Bonin

1952-1963
Position L
Shoots L
Weight 170lbs
Height 5'10"
Date of birth September 12th, 1932
Place of birth Montreal, QC, CAN
Seasons - MTL 5
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 280 68 137 205 0 220
1957-1958 66 15 24 39 0 37
1958-1959 57 13 30 43 0 38
1959-1960 59 17 34 51 0 59
1960-1961 65 16 35 51 0 45
1961-1962 33 7 14 21 0 41
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 34 11 11 22 0 47
1957-1958 9 0 1 1 0 2
1958-1959 11 10 5 15 0 4
1959-1960 8 1 4 5 0 12
1960-1961 6 0 1 1 0 29

NICKNAMED “L’OURS DE JOLIETTE,” MARCEL BONIN WAS ONE OF THE MOST FREE-SPIRITED PLAYERS OF HIS TIME.

With 174 pounds packed onto his 5-foot-7 frame, Marcel Bonin wasn’t the biggest guy in the NHL but he was one of the strongest players in the league in the 1950s and early 1960s. A rugged forward who could skate, score and pass while playing on either wing, his off-ice exploits made him somewhat of a folk hero in his native province.

Bonin once climbed into the ring to wrestle a bear, earning himself the nickname “L’ours de Joliette”. Known to chew and eat glass from time to time, Bonin was a free spirit, who was always popular with teammates and enjoyed every minute of his bruising, decade-long pro hockey career.

Turning pro with the Quebec Aces in 1951-52, Bonin established himself as a skilled practitioner of the more physical aspects of the game. Scrappy and determined, he rarely lost a battle for the puck along the boards or in the corner. The rookie picked up 131 penalty minutes, showcasing his pugilistic abilities.

Bonin began the 1951-52 season in Quebec but his rights were soon sent to Detroit. He divided the remainder of the year between the AHL’s St. Louis Flyers and the big club, appearing in his first 37 NHL contests.

Returned to the minors, Bonin played only one game with Detroit in 1953-54. He fought his way back to the big leagues, sticking with the Red Wings to start the next season. His rookie campaign would be one to remember, as it ended with a Stanley Cup victory over the Montreal Canadiens in the spring of 1955.

On the move again, Bonin spent the following year in Boston. He made his return to Quebec when the Canadiens picked him up in the 1957 inter-league draft. The four and a half years Bonin spent wearing “La Sainte Flanelle” were the best of his hockey career.

Playing on a line with Jean Beliveau and “Boom Boom” Geoffrion, the stocky Bonin did a lot of the heavy lifting for the Habs. Strong in the corners and a precise passer, the robust Bonin also had one of the heaviest hip checks in the league. No longer having to prove himself with his fists, Bonin took to preventing potential fisticuffs using a bear hug that took all the fight out of the men on the receiving end.

Popular with both fans and teammates, Bonin scored an average of 15 goals each season and added about twice as many assists. A member of the Canadiens teams that won three consecutive Stanley Cups, Bonin preferred to let the other guys score the goals and deal with the pressures and expectations placed on snipers.

In 1958-59, an injured Maurice Richard was limited to only four playoff games while Beliveau appeared in just three. Coming off a 13-goal season, Bonin donned the Rocket’s abandoned gloves for good luck. Something of Richard must have rubbed off as Bonin scored 10 times in the postseason, his last goal securing the Stanley Cup.

His career was cut short when a back injury midway through the 1961-62 season sidelined the 31-year-old forward for good.

Long active in amateur sport in his hometown of Joliette, Bonin has since become a noted historian throughout his retirement years.