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Joueurs

PHIL WATSON (1943-1944)

Phil
Watson

1952-1963
Position R
Shoots R
Weight 165lbs
Height 5'11"
Date of birth April 24th, 1914
Place of birth Montreal, QC, CAN
Deceased on February 1st, 1991
Seasons - MTL 1
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 44 17 32 49 0 61
1943-1944 44 17 32 49 0 61
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 9 3 5 8 0 16
1943-1944 9 3 5 8 0 16
Scrappy and competitive, Phil Watson spent all but one of his 13 NHL campaigns with New York, the sparkplug of a Rangers team that made the postseason six springs in a row from 1937 to 1942, winning it all in 1940.

The single season he did not call Madison Square Garden home was spent with the Canadiens in 1943-44. A French-speaking native of Quebec City, the talkative Watson fit right in during his loan to the Habs, making an impact almost immediately.

In Montreal, Watson centered wingmen Ray Getliffe and Murph Chamberlain, a trio nicknamed “The Gabby Line” due to the very verbal nature of all three men on it. Watson pivoted a potent offensive unit, one that put 149 points into the record book that season.

The fiery Watson chipped in 49 of them, notching 17 goals, his best total to date. He also spent 61 minutes in the penalty box, third-highest among Habs players that season.

A reliable performer once the playoffs got underway, Watson continued to give everything he had on every shift. He picked up eight points in the nine games, leading the Canadiens to a Stanley Cup Championship in 1944, tying for the team lead with 16 penalty minutes in the postseason.

The 1944 playoffs proved to be Watson’s final postseason appearance as a player. He returned to the Rangers and hung up his skates following the 1947-48 season to join the coaching ranks. Returning to the NHL in that capacity, he later ran the bench for both the New York Rangers and Boston Bruins.