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Joueurs

RICK GREEN (1982-1989)

Rick
Green

1952-1963
Position D
Shoots L
Weight 220lbs
Height 6'3"
Date of birth February 20th, 1956
Place of birth Belleville, ON, CAN
Seasons - MTL 7
Statistiques
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 399 10 79 89 37 183
1982-1983 66 2 24 26 23 58
1983-1984 7 0 1 1 -5 7
1984-1985 77 1 18 19 -11 30
1985-1986 46 3 2 5 -9 20
1986-1987 72 1 9 10 -1 10
1987-1988 59 2 11 13 21 33
1988-1989 72 1 14 15 19 25
SEASON
SEASON
GP Games played - Number of games the player has set foot on the ice
G Goals - Number of goals the player has scored
A Assists - Number of goals the player has assisted in
PTS Points - Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
+/- Plus/Minus - The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice
PIM Penalties infraction minutes - Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed
TOTALS 97 3 16 19 -2 73
1982-1983 3 0 0 0 0 2
1983-1984 15 1 2 3 0 33
1984-1985 12 0 3 3 0 14
1985-1986 18 1 4 5 0 8
1986-1987 17 0 4 4 0 8
1987-1988 11 0 2 2 -2 2
1988-1989 21 1 1 2 0 6

A PILLAR ON THE CANADIENS’ BLUE LINE, RICK GREEN SPENT SEVEN SEASONS IN MONTREAL, DURING WHICH HE WON ONE STANLEY CUP.

Big, strong and with enough of a mean streak to make his opponents hesitate before invading his territory, Rick Green spent 15 years patrolling the blue line with four NHL teams, enjoying the best years of his career with the Montreal Canadiens.

Green broke into the NHL with the Washington Capitals, who chose him first overall in the 1976 Amateur Draft. A tough competitor who specialized in clearing the Capitals’ goalmouth of opposing players, Green also contributed to Washington’s offensive efforts, chipping in from 20 to 40 points a season, but not playing a single postseason game until he left the U.S. capital.

After six seasons that established him as one of the toughest rearguards in the league, Green came to Montreal with Ryan Walter in the blockbuster 1982 deal that saw four Habs head to Washington. Green continued his effective, robust play, quickly becoming a stalwart on the Canadiens blue line.

For the next seven years, the 6-foot-3, 220-pounder flattened opposing forwards in front of the net, dug for the puck along the boards and battled in the corners. His point totals diminished as Green concentrated on his duties as a stay-at-home defenseman but his utility to the team did not.

After missing a large part of the 1985-86 season with a broken thumb, Green came back and contributed a career-high five postseason points on the way to the Habs’ 23rd Stanley Cup Championship.

While his work often went unnoticed by fans, the local media were paying attention. They voted the big defender with the low public profile as the 1987 Jacques Beauchamp Trophy winner, recognizing his unsung contributions to the team.

Green’s body paid the price of his rugged approach to the game and he announced his retirement following the 1988-89 season. He later reconsidered, playing briefly in Europe and then returning to the NHL where he wore Red Wings and Islanders jerseys before hanging up his skates for good in 1992.

Smoothly making the transition to the coaching ranks, Green served as an assistant with both the Islanders and Los Angeles Kings before returning to the fold in Montreal. Hired in the early weeks of 1999-00, he spent the next six years behind the bench as an assistant coach.