Canadiens Historical Websitehttp://www.canadiens.comRSS Feed from the Canadien's centinnial websiteen-caWed, 16 Apr 2014 03:14:36 -0400Wed, 16 Apr 2014 03:14:36 -040030Copyright/rss/Canadiens Historical Websitehttp://ourhistory.canadiens.com/static/admin/images/logo.pnghttp://ourhistory.canadiens.com163122 <![CDATA[Salt in the wounds]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Salt-In-The-Wounds http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Salt-In-The-Wounds Mon, 14 Apr 2014 00:00:00 -0400
In preparation for their pending weekend of male bonding, Larose asked veteran hunter Laperriere to pick him up some ammo. After arriving at their final destination, the guys quickly set about bagging some fowl for dinner, a feat which proved pretty easy for all the finely-tuned athletes. All except one, of course.

“Every time Larose shot at a pheasant, the bird just kept soaring away unscathed,” recalled Laperriere with a grin. “He started thinking his gun had to be broken or something.”

So Laperriere grabbed the rifle and reloaded to prove it was the user – not the weapon – that was malfunctioning.

The point was made. Two shots, two direct hits, two birds. While the rest of the gang managed to haul in enough pheasant on which to feast, Larose came back empty-handed and confused. Taking his place beside the campfire later that night, the dejected winger settled in to eat the fruits of his teammates’ labor.

“The guys all tried comforting him, telling him they would take him out hunting again. Only next time, it would be for something a little more his speed… like elephants,” laughed Laperriere.

Meanwhile, the All-Star Canadiens defenseman decided to throw a bone to his perplexed teammate, tipping him off to the reason he couldn’t seem to land a shot all day.

“I decided to play a little prank on him so instead of packing his ammo with gunpowder, I used salt,” recounted Laperriere. “Larose finally figured it out – but not until I suggested using his bullets to season his dinner!”

***
SEE ALSO
Size does matter
Dressed for success
Up against the wall
Helmets are a player's best friend
Dude, where's my car?
Flower Power
Tom and Dickie]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Watch What You Eat]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Watch-What-You-Eat http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Watch-What-You-Eat Mon, 31 Mar 2014 00:00:00 -0400
One afternoon in 1968, DesRoches was tagging along with the Habs as they rode their team bus back to the Forum after a press conference at the Molson brewery. This was the moment Montreal defenseman Jacques Laperrière chose to offer DesRoches a seemingly innocent gift that was ultimately destined to give him the fright of his life.

“I used to have these special candies that would turn the mouth of whoever ate them completely blue,” recalled Laperrière. “I gave him one during the ride, expecting him to eat it right on the spot.”

But that’s not what happened. Instead, DesRoches put the sweet in his pocket for later and Laperrière soon forgot about his little prank entirely. That is, until he received a phone call about a month later that served as a very loud reminder of the incident. As Laperrière put the receiver to his ear, he was greeted by DesRoches. “’I’m calling the cops on you, you @#$%&*!’ he screamed at me,” recounted Laperrière.

After a few minutes of verbal abuse, DesRoches finally calmed down enough to explain what had gotten him so enraged in the first place.

“He was out shopping with his wife when he finally ate the candy. A few minutes later, he noticed his wife staring at him with an absolutely terrified expression on her face,” explained Laperrière.

Convinced that he was on the brink of death, she herded him into a taxi and off they rushed to the hospital. The ER doctors, much like DesRoches’ wife, were of the opinion that having one’s mouth suddenly turn completely blue for no apparent reason wasn’t the best indicator of good health, and had him begin a battery of tests to determine the gravity of his condition.

“They made poor DesRoches get an electrocardiogram and a whole slew of other painful tests,” admitted the guilty party.

Finally, the test results came back. All of DesRoches’ vital signs were perfect, and the only part of him to end up getting damaged from the ordeal was his ego when he realized that it was Laperrière and his infamous candy were the culprits responsible.

SEE ALSO
Up against the wall
Helmets are a player's best friend
Dude, where's my car?
Flower Power
Tom and Dickie
The Welcome Wagon
A Sticky Situation]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Size does Matter]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Size-Does-Matter http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Size-Does-Matter Mon, 17 Mar 2014 00:00:00 -0400
After being drafted by the Canadiens in the first round in June 1971, Larry Robinson headed to training camp that fall determined to earn his spot with the big club.  

“I showed up to my first camp to go through that battery of medicals and tests and I was maybe 193 pounds soaking wet,” recalled the  6-foot-4 Hall-of-Famer. “They told me I only needed to bring my skates with me and the team would give me everything else. So I sat down and started getting ready for my first-ever practice with the Montreal Canadiens.

“I put on my shin pads and they were tiny – there was a space of about three or four inches between my shin pad and my ankle,” he continued. “I was already terrified enough just being in the dressing room with those guys so I kept my mouth shut and went out onto the ice with the small pads.”  

Robinson’s first strides on Forum ice went off without a hitch – before “Big Bird” laid a crushing check on veteran Claude Larose in an intra-squad scrimmage.

“Luckily, nothing came of that hit,” laughed Robinson, who went on to suit up for a team-record 1,202 games throughout his 17-year career on the Habs blue line. “I didn’t take any shots to the shins or anything like that. When we were all back in the room after the practice, Guy Lapointe looked over at me laughing from his spot and asked, ‘Larry, what’s the deal?’ He saw how short my pads were and went to see equipment manager Eddy Palchak to get me a pair a little more my size.”  

With the problem now solved, the 20-year-old did a little detective work to find out just who had christened the pint-sized pads before him.

“I was taking off my gear and I took a look at the shin pads Eddy had given me originally,” continued Robinson. “It turned out they had the No. 9 marked on the inside. Imagine that; it was the first pro camp of my life, and I was out there skating around in ‘Rocket’ Richard’s game-used equipment!”

***
SEE ALSO
Dressed for success
Up against the wall
Helmets are a player's best friend
Dude, where's my car?
Flower Power
Tom and Dickie
The Welcome Wagon
A Sticky Situation]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Joy and pain]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Joy-And-Pain http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Joy-And-Pain Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:00:00 -0500
None of those injuries was more worth the sacrifice than the one Lach suffered during the 1953 Stanley Cup Finals against the Bruins. With the Canadiens leading the series 3-1, the fifth game, scoreless after 60 minutes, went into overtime. Only 82 seconds into the extra frame, a Bruins miscue handed Lach and the Habs the Cup on a silver platter.

“The puck appeared on my stick and I just shot it”, Lach recalled. “I couldn’t shoot it very hard. In fact, Toe Blake always said ‘Your shot wouldn’t break a paper bag’, but I shot it and it went in the net and that was it.”

Well, not quite. After scoring the biggest goal of his career, Lach jetted toward the middle of the ice where long-time linemate Maurice “Rocket” Richard was barrelling toward him with his arms outstretched.

The resulting high-impact, airborne embrace was as bone crushing a hit as any handed out in the heat of play. Lach skated away from the voluntary collision with his third Stanley Cup victory and the seventh broken nose of his career.

“I guess I was too aggressive and my nose was in the way,” Lach chuckled. “I hit my nose on his head. It didn’t feel too bad because we’d just won the Stanley Cup, and that was more important.”

The photo that captured the collision remains one of the most famous shots in team history. But for Lach, he need only look in the mirror to see a reminder of that memorable night at the Forum.

See also
Stuck on you
Attention to detail
Welcome to the Rock
Hull's not-so secret admirer
The Man With One Red Shoe
Is there a doctor in the house?
A White Welcome
Boss' Orders
Birds of a Feather
Howe could you?]]>
Players
<![CDATA[10 seconds in the NHL]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/10-Seconds-In-The-NHL http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/10-Seconds-In-The-NHL Mon, 24 Feb 2014 00:00:00 -0500
After spending the better part of the 1967-68 season in the CPHL as a member of the Houston Apollos, Monahan finally made the trip to Montreal to hit the ice for the first time in a Habs jersey. Finding himself in a locker room packed with legends like Béliveau, Cournoyer and Henri Richard, it didn’t take long for the 20-year-old’s nerves to get the better of him.

On Jan. 13, 1968, the Bruins were paying a visit to the Forum to face off against the Habs. With the Montreal squad up by a score of 4-1 in the middle of the third period, Toe Blake called on Monahan to get into the play. For the young center, the chance to prove what he could do had finally arrived.

“I jumped out on the ice and headed towards Jean Béliveau to take his place by the faceoff circle. My legs were actually shaking. To this day, I’m still not sure if that was because of the stress or because of the 40 minutes I had just spent sitting, doing nothing on the bench.”

Monahan can remember every last detail from the events that transpired over the following 10 seconds.

“After the faceoff, I ended up behind our net. When I saw Eddie Shack from the Bruins barrelling at me with a full head of steam, I decided I’d get rid of the puck and shoot it around the boards, like a defenseman’s supposed to do.”

Monahan then squared himself up to receive the check, never realizing what was about to happen.

“The moment we collided, we both ended up falling to our knees. I’m not exactly sure what happened next, but when I got up, someone shot the puck up around the glass and it bounced off and hit me directly in the eye.”

The result was an unconscious Garry Monahan lying on the ice, knocked out cold after only 10 seconds in the NHL. “And that was my start in the National Hockey League,” laughed Monahan, who would go on to bounce back nicely from his rocky start.

“The worst thing about the whole story was that when I woke up the next morning with a huge, ugly black eye, it also happened to be the same day we were scheduled to do a photo shoot for our hockey card pictures.”

***
SEE ALSO
Train Games
Give it away now
Salt in the wounds
Size does matter
Dressed for success
Up against the wall
Helmets are a player's best friend
Dude, where's my car?]]>
Players
<![CDATA[The Welcome Wagon]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/The-Welcome-Wagon http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/The-Welcome-Wagon Mon, 10 Feb 2014 00:00:00 -0500
While the visitors’ dressing room was a far cry from luxurious at the Forum, the only amenity opposing teams really needed to bring along with them to Montreal was a heavy-duty padlock – especially when Habs

All-Star and prankster extraordinaire Guy Lapointe was around. To hear Rod Langway tell it, visitors to la Belle Province had to have their guard up both on and off the ice.

“Anyone who has played with Guy knows enough to be looking over their shoulder at all times,” explained Langway, who patrolled the Habs’ blue line with Lapointe from 1978-79 to 1981-82. “The thing about Pointu, though, is that he would find a way to get you even if you were playing against him. Everyone was a target for him. No one was safe.”

Once the visiting team had left for their hotel after a game-day skate, Pointu got to work.  Like a stealthy lion hunting his prey, Lapointe would skulk into the opposing team’s dressing room undetected, setting his plan into action.  Armed with a few key weapons – scissors, tape and an eagle-eyed lookout man – Lapointe would find former teammates’ equipment and make a few custom “alterations”.

“I remember walking into the room once and I was about to start getting dressed and I saw that the laces on my pants had been cut,” recalled Langway, who played 11 seasons for the Capitals after his four-year stint in Montreal.  “My gloves were taped together with what must have been an entire roll of tape, but that wasn’t all – he’d gotten to my skate laces, too!”

While Langway’s Capitals teammates were ready to help the big defenseman find the culprit, there was no need to contact the authorities and open an investigation.

“The funny thing was, I didn’t even have to ask who did it,” shrugged Langway. “I just knew it couldn’t be anyone other than Pointu!”

See also
A Sticky Situation
The old switcheroo
Mikey Scissohands
The Bear Essentials
One of a kind
Joy and pain
Stuck on you
Attention to detail]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Sticking with it]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Sticking-With-It http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Sticking-With-It Mon, 27 Jan 2014 00:00:00 -0500
“Doug would always be the first guy at the rink, so whenever you arrived, he’d have already been there for at least a half hour,” recalled Dykhuis, who played with Gilmour from 2001 to 2003 in Montreal. “One morning he had a gag he pulled on all of the younger guys.

“He used one of those old two-piece Easton sticks specialized to his pattern. He went up to the first guy in the room and just said, ‘Hey, I think my stick is crooked – can you check it out?’” recounted the 13-year NHL veteran. “This was Doug Gilmour – he’s the leader of the team – so of course we’re all jumping to help him out.”

What the then-Habs blue-liner didn’t know was that Gilmour had already spent plenty of his pre-practice time tinkering with his customized stick.

“I wanted to be helpful so I grabbed it and checked it out, but he told me I could only really see it if I tilted it up toward the light,” explained Dykhuis. “I didn’t even question it; if Doug tells me to do something, I’m doing it. So I tilt it up... and the stick is full of water! It just poured all over me, so I was soaking wet.”

Never one to rest on his laurels, Gilmour wasn’t about to stop at drenching just one gullible teammate. Once he had tricked his victim, the sneaky veteran would head to the shower, refill the shaft, and patiently wait for his next target to surface.

“He’d get guys one by one before they even made it into the dressing room, so they were in full suits,” added the now 38-year-old. “And you’re definitely not going to warn them because once you get wet, you want to make sure it happens to as many other guys as possible!

“Dougie didn’t pull pranks all that often so you didn’t expect it, but he was a really funny guy,” revealed Dykhuis. “He always knew when guys were feeling a bit too tense and he’d crack a joke or pull a stunt like that and it always loosened everyone right up.”]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Up Against the Wall]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Up-Against-The-Wall http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Up-Against-The-Wall Sun, 26 Jan 2014 00:00:00 -0500
By the end of the 1950s, Richard was cementing his reputation as one of the Habs’ biggest stars of the era. With several companies looking to capitalize on the hype surrounding the young hockey player, a soft-drink company by the name of Kik decided to offer him a sponsorship deal. Every week, a sizable shipment of the beverage would be delivered to No.16’s front door, and Richard, not quite sure what to do with the surplus of product began stockpiling the cases in his garage.

One night while Richard was out, his teammates decided to take advantage of the empty house and have a little fun at their friend’s expense.

“They used the opportunity to pull every last case of Kik out of his garage and – with a little help from a few understanding police officers – began stacking them right in the middle of the street,” recalled Gilles Tremblay, Richard’s teammate of nine seasons.

When Richard finally turned onto his street at two in the morning, he was surprised to find a large, painstakingly stacked, wall of Kik blocking his way.

Not wanting to wake the neighbours and with no one around to help, the future Hall of Famer did the only thing he could. He got out of his car in the middle of the night and began the slow process of moving the soft-drink cases, one-by-one, back into his garage.

While most people would have likely seen red and began plotting revenge, the good-natured “Pocket Rocket” took the prank in stride.

“Believe it or not,” chuckled Tremblay, “According to a few very reliable sources, he spent the rest of the night moving those boxes doubled over and laughing his head off.”

See also
Helmets are a player's best friend
Dude, where's my car?
Flower Power
Tom and Dickie
The Welcome Wagon
A Sticky Situation
The old switcheroo]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Where are they now? Pierre Mondou]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Where-Are-They-Now-Pierre-Mondou http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Where-Are-They-Now-Pierre-Mondou Wed, 16 Oct 2013 00:00:00 -0400
Where are you currently living?
I’ve been living in Sorel-Tracy since I retired with the Canadiens in 1985.

What are you up to these days?
I just finished my seventh year as a part-time amateur scout for the New Jersey Devils. I cover Quebec, eastern Ontario and a bit of the northern United States.

How many times per year do you still lace up the skates?
Unfortunately I was forced to quit playing altogether about five years ago due to a problem with my shoulder.

Do you still stay in touch with any of your former teammates?
Yeah, I like to pop into the Alumni Lounge at the Bell Centre whenever I’m there during the regular season, and I usually attend a few alumni golf tournaments each summer. We also make it a point to organize a big dinner for the alumni at the beginning of each season to help us all stay in touch.

Around how many Canadiens games do you end up watching each season?
As many as I can! With my scouting job during the regular season, I usually have time to catch the highlights or the condensed versions of the game at the end of the night.

When was the last time you made it out to the Bell Centre for a game?
Last season. I tend to make it out to about three or four games every year, and I always take the opportunity to pass by the Alumni Lounge whenever I’m there.

Who is your favorite player on the Canadiens’ current roster?
I’m a big fan of Carey Price. It’s great that he was just able to sign a long-term contract with the team. He’s definitely a top-tier goaltender and I’m convinced they made the right choice by signing him.

Is there a game that you played in during your time with the Canadiens that sticks out in your mind?
Let’s say I came on board with the Canadiens at the right time, because we won a few Stanley Cups in a row at the time when I started playing there. But I think my fondest memories are of the games we used to play with the Nordiques. Playoff games against that team were always intense. If they managed to beat us, we knew we were in for a long summer. We had an incredible rivalry with them.

Where do you keep your Stanley Cup Championship rings?
I’ve kept them all, but I don’t wear them very often – they’re pretty huge. I consider them all priceless to me.]]>
Players
<![CDATA[Mother Russia]]> http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Mother-Russia http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/article/Mother-Russia Fri, 23 Aug 2013 00:00:00 -0400
“One of the coolest experiences I had with the Canadiens was our trip to Russia during training camp,” described Ewen, whose team headed to Moscow and Riga to take on the best the Soviets had to offer that fall. “It was a very different world than we were used to.  From the second we arrived, we had our own private security detail of KGB guys following us around everywhere.

“There’s nothing that makes you feel less safe than walking around with guys with AK47s strapped to them. I never wanted anything more than to have a black trench coat to wear around so I could blend in. Instead we walked around in the most conspicuous red-white-and-blue tracksuits imaginable.”

With the 1975 New Year’s Eve battle with the Canadiens still fresh in the mind of the Soviets, the bleu-blanc-rouge tracksuits proved the perfect target for the still-bitter Russians. 

“There was such a rivalry between the Red Army and the Canadiens – they wanted nothing more than to beat us,” explained Ewen. “The difference was, they had been training for half a year just to play us and we were in training camp – and back then you didn’t come to camp in game shape, you used camp to get into shape.

 “We did pretty well, though,” added the bruising winger, whose team left the Soviet Union with a 2-2 record. “The last game [against CSKA Moscow] got a little physical and then the fans started whistling and throwing coins at us that must have weighed like five pounds each. It was a really unique experience over there, to say the least.”

 The adventure continued for Ewen & Co. back at the hotel later that night. After having carefully locked away all their valuables in their rooms, the team returned to discover all of their wives’ makeup had been stolen for sale on the black market. At a 400% markup, makeup may have been a hot commodity in Moscow, but ultimately it was the team’s brand itself that carried the most value.

“You would not believe how widely recognized the CH is internationally. It’s phenomenal,” marveled Ewen. “That logo means so much across the world. We’d put on our Canadiens gear and everyone wanted to get a hold of it – it’s the tradition and the pinnacle of hockey. Or maybe there was just an appreciation for loud Habs tracksuits that we didn’t know about!”

See also
Sticking with it
Arrested development
Stuck on you
Attention to detail
Welcome to the Rock
Hull's not-so secret admirer
The Man With One Red Shoe]]>
Players